Chameleon Coloring Pages

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Their most distinctive feature is undoubtedly their ability to change skin color, a skill that not all specimens possess. You can get chameleon coloring pictures below. These exotic reptiles will make your day fun. Happy coloring.

The change of color of the chameleon not only serves to camouflage itself in the surrounding environment but also responds to physiological and psychological changes.

Chameleon Coloring Pages

chameleon coloring book page
chameleon coloring book page
chameleon coloring page free
chameleon coloring page free
chameleon coloring page printable
chameleon coloring page printable
chameleon coloring pages to print
chameleon coloring pages to print
simple chameleon coloring page
simple chameleon coloring page

Chameleons have very variable dimensions. The last census published in 2015 counts more than 200 species (half of which live only in Madagascar).

Some specimens are so small that they walk on a fingernail. Adult sizes range from 3 to over 60 cm, and the smallest existing species is called Brookesia Micra, which reaches a maximum length of 3 cm when adult.

Being diurnal animals, they only come out of the den during the day to hunt insects – the basis of their daily diet – and to sunbathe.

These animals live mainly in trees, moving from one branch to another. For this reason, the chameleon is a tree species, but it can also live in bushes or smaller specimens, among the tufts of grass.

Its natural habitat is the rainforest and tropical forest, but it adapts well to the semi-desert environments of Africa (Madagascar) and southern Europe (Andalusia and Greece).

The chameleon is mainly an insectivorous animal: it eats butterflies, mosquitoes, grasshoppers, and dragonflies. Sometimes it also hunts spiders, scorpions, small snakes, and other types of arachnids.

Larger male specimens eat small vertebrates such as mice and young birds.

The color of the chameleon is a peculiar characteristic, and the way they change it is a bit different from what we expect. The popular belief is that chameleons take the color of what they touch, but this is not the case.

It helps to camouflage itself, but it mainly serves to communicate. It is a physiological reaction, a “colored” language used to express courtship, competition, or environmental stress.

For example, some species take on a black or dark color during the early morning hours to absorb as much heat as possible. Or it is used by the male specimen to indicate that the female has already been fecundated.